Human Rights education and training are lifelong processes that concern all ages. UN Declaration on Human Rights Education, 2011
Do you want to know who you are?
Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.

Thomas Jefferson

Classroom Guests and Consultants

The design and implementation of Informed Action Projects requires that students take ownership of information and translate this into actions.  A key part of this process is engaging them in discussions with community and experts who bring knowledge and experience in identifying and addressing problems.
The arts illuminate aspects of our culture and, especially, portray challenges to basic Human Rights in contemporary societies. By bringing artists into the classroom, students gain understanding of different cultures and the diverse perspectives of other groups in their community as well as globally.

Artists

Theo Martey, shown leading an African drum workshop, and his Akwaaba Ensemble bring high-energy West African drumming and dance performance that demonstrate the subtle rhythmic patterns and styles specific to different tribal groups. Students learn and practice several songs during workshops, then join the group on stage for public performances.

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Experts

Dr. Kingsley Kabari grew up amid civil war in Nigeria and immigrated to the US as a teenager, with no formal education and limited English language skills. He now is a practicing Chiropractor who, in addition to helping students understand problems associated with poor nutrition, substance abuse, and lack of exercise, teaches them the importance of education in preventing recruitment of youth into radical groups.

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